Saturday, April 09, 2005

Dying for Taiwan Independence

Dying for Taiwan Independence
Bevin Chu
April 8, 2005

Taiwan Students too Intelligent to Die for Taiwan Independence

According to the results of a scientific poll conducted in late March by the Chinese Culture University on Taiwan, 65% of the university students on Taiwan would be unwilling to defend the island if the Chinese Communists were to attack; only 35% would be willing. Released on April 7, 2005, the poll surveyed 1161 students enrolled at National Taiwan University, National Chengchi University, and nine other major universities in northern Taiwan.

Poll: University Students' Views on Cross Straits Conflict
Source: Culture Weekly, Chinese Culture University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC

Question One: "If the Chinese Communists attack Taiwan, would you be willing to defend Taiwan's territory?"



- Unwilling: 65%
- Willing: 35%

Question Two: "If the Chinese Communists attack Taiwan, what would be your reaction?"



- Raise the white flag and surrender: 18.1%
- Wait to die: 19.2%
- Wait for US or other troops to come to the rescue: 21.9%
- Resist to the end: 28.6%
- Other: 12.2%

Question Three: "Why wouldn't you be willing to go to the front line?" (不參戰的原因?)



- As a woman I oppose war (我是女生, 應遠離戰爭): 22.8%
- Taiwan is no match for the Chinese mainland (臺灣不是大陸的對手): 30.5%
- Going to war will merely turn me into cannon fodder (參戰也只能當炮灰): 25.6%
- If a fight is necessary, it would be better to reunify with the Chinese mainland (與其開戰, 不如統一): 12.2%

The Coalition of the Unwilling


So what is one to make of these fascinating poll results?

Some would-be Rambos might snort with disgust, having concluded that university students on Taiwan are "cowards."

I would politely but firmly disagree. The reason the brightest young minds on Taiwan are unwilling to fight in the event the Chinese mainland attacks, is not because they are unwilling to "fight for their country."

The reason they are unwilling to fight in the event the mainland attacks the island, is that they are not willing to fight for Taiwan independence. Taiwan independence is not synonymous with Taiwan. Taiwan is merely part of their country. Their country is the "Republic of China," or "China" for short.

University students on Taiwan know that if the mainland ever attacks the island it will be for one reason and one reason only: a 15% to 20% hardcore of Taiwan independence zealots who have hijacked the ROC, have made their final desperate move toward formal independence, against the will of the overwhelming majority of patriotic Chinese citizens who wish to maintain the status quo until the time is ripe for "reunification."

University students on Taiwan don't consider redefining themselves as "Taiwanese, not Chinese" something worth fighting and dying for. University students on Taiwan consider themselves Chinese. Just as "Tasmanians" are merely Australians who live on the offshore Australian island of Tasmania, so "Taiwanese" are merely Chinese who live on the offshore Chinese island of Taiwan. Who wants to die for that?

For Taiwan independence sympathizers who have been brainwashed by Taiwan independence propaganda for the past 17 years, the results of this March 2005 poll should provide a badly needed reality check. Taiwan independence sympathizers may wish to ask themselves, is Taiwan independence really something they are willing to die for, when even "Taiwanese" themselves are not?

1 comment:

  1. Dear Bevin,

    I lived in Taiwan for four years (98-02). I find your reasoning a little dubious on this point.

    I don't think Taiwanese people are so willing to fight primarily because they think it's a losing cause. Taiwan is just too small to take on China by itself. 55% of the people in the poll indicated that fighting China would only mean certain death (cannon fodder) or that it was hopeless.

    That doesn't mean that these people actually wish to be part of China.

    Second, the polls concern university students in the northern part only. That's not exactly representative of all the people who live in Taiwan.

    Ryan

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